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Great idea for an app ... See MoreSee Less

Identify trees with our Tree ID app this summer! Use our free Tree ID app for Android and iPhone to identify the UK's native and non-native trees. Identify trees by their bark, twigs, buds, leaves, flowers or fruit.Identify trees by their bark, twigs, buds, leaves, flowers or fruit. It's an A-Z tree guide in your pocket! The app is available for Android and iPhone 5 and newer models (iOS 9 and above): www.woodlandtru.st/Raj5k

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Designed by Dara age 8 at our summer camp today #rocketscience #science #engineering ... See MoreSee Less

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Pneumatic trucks in operation #techcard #teensciencecamp ... See MoreSee Less

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Avogadro's number is one of my favourites ... See MoreSee Less

Today is the birthday of Amedeo Avogadro, a mathematical physicist best known for his hypothesis now called Avogadro’s law. He was born in 1776 in Turin, Italy. As a young man, Avogadro followed in his father’s footsteps and studied and practiced law. However, finding that he preferred science, Avogadro began privately studying mathematics and physics, focusing on physical chemistry. In 1803 Avogadro published his first scientific paper, on the electrical behavior of salt solutions. Within three years he gave up law and started teaching math and physics at a high school in Turin, and in 1809 he became a senior teacher at the Royal College of Vercelli. It was in 1811 that Avogadro first published what would become his most important scientific contribution: the hypothesis that equal volumes of gases at the same temperature and pressure contain equal numbers of molecules. It took decades, however, before Avogadro’s law became widely accepted, in part because the theory disagreed with those of better known scientists at the time, such as John Dalton and Jöns Jacob Berzelius. In 1820 Avogadro became the first chair of mathematical physics at the University of Turin, but lost the job several years later when the university closed for political reasons. A decade later, he was reappointed to the post, which he then held until he retired at the age of 74. Avogadro died at age 79 in 1856.

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